HOW TO WRITE A COVER LETTER

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Although cover letters are not usually necessary, many hiring managers use them to assess an applicant’s abilities, experience, and background. The key to drafting a great cover letter is to clearly demonstrate how your professional expertise meets the demands of the available position and the hiring company’s culture.

What is a cover letter?

A cover letter, also known as an application letter, is a three- to four-paragraph memo to employers that explains your interest in the job and organization, as well as your suitability for the position. In a job application, it is often presented alongside your resume. This letter should highlight your qualifications, experience, and accomplishments relevant to the position you want. Cover letters, unlike resumes, allow you to go into further detail about your professional experience and explain why you’re a good fit for the position and firm.

Format of a cover letter 

  • Salutation/greeting
  • Opening paragraph
  • Middle paragraphs
  • Closing paragraph
  • Complimentary close and signature

Resource: Indeed

  • Salutation/greeting

Start your cover letter off on the right foot by addressing the recruitment manager. If you can, find out the name of the recruitment manager for the role you’re applying for. It may require some guesswork about gender and marital status on your part—just use their first and last name: “Dear Alex Johnson.” Avoid outdated greetings such as “Dear Sir or Madam” or “To Whom It May Concern.”

  • Opening paragraph

Catch the recruitment manager’s attention, introduce yourself, and enthusiastically tell the employer why you’re applying for the job. Mention the job title you’re applying for as well as where you saw the job posting. Explain your interest in the position and company to demonstrate that you’ve done your research.

  • Middle paragraphs

Make the connection between your previous accomplishments (skills, experience,etc.), how you would help the company, and your readiness for this new role. Employers will likely have read your CV already, so avoid repeating the bullet points. Instead, include details that more deeply illustrate those highlights.

  • Closing paragraph

Thank the employer for their time and consideration. Sum up your qualifications for the role. Express an interest in continuing to the next stage in the recruitment process

  • Complimentary close and signature

Choose a complimentary closing that is friendly yet formal, followed by your first and last name. Closings you might consider include: Sincerely; Regards; Best; Respectfully. Avoid closings such as Cheers, Warm Regards, Thanks a Ton, or Yours Truly which may be considered too casual or affectionate.